Bright Blue Hydrangeas

I have seen several beautiful hydrangea bushes in our neighborhood.

This bright blue color is my favorite, by far. The color is much brighter than it seems in the picture.

Every day we pass these bushes, more blooms emerge.

Since I took these pictures, the bushes have turned almost solid blue. They look more like this:

I would like to put hydrangea bushes at the corners of the front of the house (obviously, further away from the house than where the old bushes once resided).

We would place them on either side, like they are in front of this house.

It is one of my favorite houses in the neighborhood. It’s difficult to capture in a picture, but the house and the landscaping are delightful.

So, what do you think? Yea, or nay on the hydrangea bushes?

This entry was posted in General, Home & Garden and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Bright Blue Hydrangeas

  1. Angie says:

    I vote Yea! For sure! I have not grown them, but from reading i’ve done, i believe that hydrangeas (in general) bloom various colors depending on the level of soil acidity. AKA, brilliant blue = more acidic soil than a light blue, or a purple. Some folks have had success in amending soil at one bush (dumping coffee grounds on that bush daily) to change the colors of the bloom. Now, you’d best check me on the blue=more acidic, because honestly i do not remember, and i don’t live somewhere where i can grow them. It’s likely you have similar dirt to the other houses/bushes in the neighborhood, but just in case, information is never a bad thing anyways.
    One of my fondest memories of my grandmothers house was her brilliant blue hydrangea bushes, all along the front of the house, that my sister and i used to play hide and seek in (i always won. She was too scared of bees to be able to stay hidden for long). I have also bought dried blue hydrangea blooms in stores, so if you’re interested in drying the blooms out, to use in flower arrangements, it’s possible.

    • Becca says:

      Thanks so much for your thoughtful comment!

      I was reading the entry in my New Garden Encyclopedia, and it did mention soil acidity. You are right, blue flowers are produced in a more acidic soil. If the soil acidity is lower, blue blooms can change to pink. From what I read, it seems that interesting colors can be created if you’re willing to experiment with changing the soil acidity. It would be really fun to dry the blooms out for flower arrangements. From what I’ve read in several places,another added bonus to these plants is that it is fairly easy to grow new plants from cuttings.

      That does sound like a great memory. I can’t say I blame your sister for being scared of the bees, and I commend you for your lack of fear. πŸ™‚

  2. Cindy says:

    I vote YAY. And I agree with it being on the other side. πŸ™‚

  3. Sarah Lewis says:

    Definitely YAY!!! I would love to have some of those in my yard but alas, I killed the ones I did have!! There are lots of them here in Longview, TX., though, so it is possible to grow them and one day I will try again!!

    • Becca says:

      You should definitely try again! πŸ™‚ I’m sure I will have many issues as I try my hand at gardening. I’m very new to it, but I am trying to do my research.

  4. Laura Burt says:

    Yay for hydrangeas!!

  5. Janice Hunter says:

    Love, love, love Hydrangeas!! The flower, the leaves, the shape..all perfect! The leaves have fall color too. So pretty, so easy to grow and maintain. And the flowers can be cut and dried to bring in the house for winter color. What more could a girl want ;o)

    • Becca says:

      Sounds perfect! Especially the easy to grow and maintain part, since I’m a novice gardener. πŸ™‚ The flowers would definitely make some nice dried arrangements, too.

Leave a Reply