Maker Versions of Verity – Round 1

If you follow the Moxie Patterns Instagram account (@moxiepatterns) then you’ve already seen this first round of sewist versions of the Verity pattern. Each of them is unique and absolutely lovely. Below each photo is a link to the blog post or Instagram associated with the maker.

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Andie’s gorgeous version of Verity had everyone drooling. Here’s the link to her blog post.

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Abbey’s amazing white split cowl shirt. She made her second tester version without the hem band and with a slightly shortened bodice. Doesn’t she look beautiful?! Go check out her Instagram account.

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Shannon’s version of the Verity top with the newly released peter pan collar option is completely adorable. I also love the way that she chose to do her sleeve bands as a cuff. Go check it out on her blog.

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Tanya’s beautiful burgundy split cowl Verity. This is her second tester version, and she chose to make a gathered skirt and add a button tab at the waistband. So lovely! Check out her blog post here.

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I’m still crushing over Valerie’s green version of the Verity dress. The material and the color both look so rich. Here’s her post on Instagram.

More maker versions to be shared soon!

The Verity pattern is on sale for Cyber Monday in my Etsy shop. Use coupon code “cyber16” for 15% off.

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See you soon with a post about some hacks for the Verity pattern. 🙂

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Posted in diy, dress, General, Moxie Patterns, pattern, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, shirt, Verity Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |Leave a comment

Floral Micro Cord Alder Shirtdress

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This dress jumped the blogging cue because it’s my new favorite, and I finally took some decent photos this time around.

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The fabric was a gift that has been in my stash for years. It’s a beautiful floral micro cord. After I made my first Grainline Alder shirtdress (still unblogged, but I did share a photo on Instagram a while back), I knew it would be a great pattern to pair with this fabric for a fall dress.

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I started with the size 2 this time, based on my high bust measurement, and did an FBA to add 3″ at full bust. I did a swayback adjustment on the back bodice, and removed some of the height from the back armscye. I also shortened the bodice portion by about 1.5″, and added the length back in the skirt.

I knew that the style wouldn’t lend itself well to a fitted waist, but I did take the waist in a tad for a little more shape. I don’t mind the ease in the waist, since my adjustments made it fit quite well in the arms, shoulders and bust.

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I have a very high waist, and I recently discovered that my sister who is 5’7″ has the same waist to knee measurement as me. Our upper legs are even the same length. This lead to an observation among family members that I am essentially a similar shape to several of my sisters (who are all 5’7″ or taller, while I come in at a whopping 5’0″), but I’m just smooshed from my shoulders to my waist, and from my knees to my ankles. Ha! I’m the oldest of my five sisters, but people rarely thought that I was the oldest when we were growing up because I was so height challenged. Too bad people don’t equate height with youth once you’re out of childhood. I don’t think there’s any mistaking that I’m the oldest now. (>_<)

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Well, I have no segway from that point, so let’s just jump right back to talking about the dress…

The pockets and all the topstitching are my favorite part. I placed my buttons closer together than the pattern calls for because I tend to prefer the security of an abundance of buttons. No free peep shows ’round these parts.

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This dress ought to be perfect for fall layering, if fall ever arrives around here. However, the fabric is lightweight enough that I should still be able to wear it during warmer months, as well. I like to make garments that I can wear in different ways during different seasons.

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Now, excuse me while I collapse in a medicine-induced stupor and (hopefully) dream I’m Thumbelina and can climb this Viriginia Creeper vine into the sky. Fingers crossed I can knock this flu and ear infection out within the next couple of days. I hope everyone is enjoying their weekend!

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Posted in clothing, dress, fashion, General, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, vintage Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |2 Comments

SBA for Verity Bodice (or Any Gathered Bodice)

sba-process-for-verityApologies for the brief radio silence. I’ve had this post planned for about a week, but I’ve been battling the flu for the past several days, and it doesn’t seem to be in a hurry to leave me in peace.

Anyway, I’ve received a few questions about small bust adjustments for the Verity bodice, so today I have a step-by-step for performing an SBA for the Verity pattern (or really any other pattern with a gathered bodice). I have also included a sheet with step-by-step illustrations for quick reference.

Verity is drafted for a C to D pattern cup size. Remember, a pattern cup size is different from a bra size. F0r example, I wear a 30F bra size, but I am only a pattern cup size D.  The pattern cup size simply refers to the difference between high bust and full bust, with each letter representing 1″ increments (A= 1″ difference, B= 2″ difference, C=3″ difference, etc).

For the sake of example, let’s say we have a high bust measurement of 32″ and a full bust measurement of 33″.

So, since Verity is drafted for a C to D pattern cup size, the pattern is drafted for at least a 3″ difference between high and full bust. We need to choose a size which best matches our actual high bust measurement to the corresponding assumed high bust measurement for the pattern. In this case, we would start with a size S. Since the full bust measurement is 35″ for this size, the assumed high bust measurement 32″ (35-3 = 32), which matches our actual high bust measurement.  Our actual full bust measurement is 33″ and not 35″, so we need to remove 2″ across the front bodice by performing an SBA on the front bodice pattern piece.

Since the 2″ must be removed across the entire bodice, and the front bodice is cut on the fold, we will be removing 1″ from our pattern piece at the full bust.

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STEP 1

Step 1: Hold the pattern piece up to yourself in the appropriate position and mark the apex of the bust. Once we have the apex marked, we can draw our lines for slashing and folding.

-Draw the first line from the bottom of the bodice piece up to the apex, parallel to the center fold line

-Draw the second line from the apex up to the armscye (about 1/3 of the way up the armscye, below the notch).

-Draw a third line from the side seam out to the apex

-Draw a fourth line across the bodice piece, about 2″ up from and parallel to the bottom of the bodice piece.

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STEP 2

Step 2: Now, we need to cut up line 1 through to the apex, and out line 2 as close to the edge of the armscye as possible without cutting into it, creating a hinge.

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STEP 3

Step 3: Next cut along line 3 from the side seam up to but not through the apex point.

Step 4

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Step 4: Fold the hinged pieces toward center front, removing 1″ at the bust. Manipulate the  hinged pieces, until the folded over edge of line 1 is parallel to the center front.

Step 5

STEP 5

Step 5: Now, we need to cut along line 4, and shorten the bottom center front piece to match the rotated piece.

Step 6

STEP 6

Step 6:  Since we removed 1″ from the underbust when we performed the SBA, we need to add the 1″ back at the underbust, so we will have enough material for creating the bust gathers. Cut along the rest of line 4 (marked step 6 above) and move the piece out to correct the underbust measurement.

STEP 7

STEP 7

Step 7: Attach a piece of paper behind the side seam segments, and draw a new side seam line. Use a curved ruler to draw the new side seam line, starting at the armscye, curving in according to your adjustments and blending out at the bottom of the bodice (see the red line in the image above. Cut along the line to create the new side seam. It may look odd now, but once you add the gathers, the side seam will be pulled in toward center front at the bottom.

Step 8: Depending on how long we need the bodice to be, we have two options to make the front and back bodice side seam lengths match up. We can lengthen the front bodice at the lengthen line, or we can shorten the back bodice piece so the side seam matches the length of the front bodice piece. This is entirely dependent on your body and length preference for the bodice.

I hope the reference sheet and step-by-step is helpful to some of you. This process can be used for any bodice with gathers under the bust. So, have fun and happy sewing!

I’ll be back soon with a recently completed selfish sewing project.

Posted in clothing, diy, dress, indie, Moxie Patterns, pattern, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, shirt, Verity Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |Leave a comment

Verity Plus Size Range XL-8X Now Available

The plus size range of the Verity pattern is now available! I received some wonderful feedback from testers, and I made some improvements that I hope will make this a pattern that people love to use and reuse. I will have a post with pictures from some lovely testers soon.

This pattern can be used to make a dress or a shirt, with sleeves or without, and it has several collar options: split cowl, regular cowl, neckband, and now a Peter Pan collar add-on. The Peter Pan collar add-on is included for free with every purchase of this pattern for a limited time. For more details and photos of the pattern variations, please see this page.

You can purchase the Verity pattern through Craftsy or my Etsy shop. You can also purchase the pattern through this page. When you click the Paypal button, there will be a drop down with the size options.

Notes about the pattern:

-This pattern is designed for use with moderate stretch knits, such as Jersey or ITY. The fabric should stretch 25-35 percent cross grain, meaning that 4 inches of material should stretch to 5 or 5.25 inches, at least. Really, you can get away with using knits that have 20% stretch too. I’ve made versions with ITY knits, jersey knits of different weights, and even pique knit (the yellow dress). The pique knit provides an example of how the garment will look with a much stiffer knit. A stiffer knit is really ideal for achieving a split cowl that stands up.

– Sizes are graded out from a sample block (size 4X) drafted specifically for a plus size figure.

– The pattern is drafted for C-D pattern cup size (3″-4″ difference between high bust and full bust) and a height of 5’6″.

– If you are between sizes, I would suggest going with the smaller size if you prefer a more fitted look.

-If you are shorter than or taller than 5’6″, you may need to shorten or lengthen the pattern pieces accordingly. However, everyone’s body is different, so you might be 5’6″ but have a short torso, for example, or 5’4″ with a long torso. There is a detailed pattern piece measurement chart included in the instructions. This should help you know what adjustments will need to be made for your height, etc. The measurement chart also includes armhole and bicep measurements. I include those measurements for ease of pattern adjustments.

-I am aware that my size chart is somewhat unusual. In the future, I will be switching to numbered sizes. Patterns will come in sizes 0-28. In the meantime, hopefully it will help some people to know that the XL-8X corresponds with numbered sizes 12-28. It is more like RTW sizing than traditional pattern sizing.

I will be working on improving the size chart for future patterns. While, I have made custom garments for women of all shapes and sizes, creating multi-size patterns in the plus range is new territory for me, but my desire is to make my designs accessible to as many woman as possible, so I am always open to suggestions and improvements.

Notes about the instructions:

-There are a lot of pages in the instructions due to the different variations. I would suggest using an electronic device for viewing the instructions, rather than printing them out. If you are a more experienced sewer, who does not need detailed step-by-step photographs, I have included “Short N’ Sweet” instructions. So, alternatively, you could simply print out those sheets.

-The instructions include a layout chart for the print-at-home version of the pattern. So, if you don’t want to print every page, you can use this grid to determine which pattern pieces are on which pages.

Notes about printing the pattern:

-The pattern has colored lines, but I print in black and white on my printer. The different colors provide varying shades of grey that help me to distinguish between the lines better. If you have a black and white only printer and you need the pattern in monochrome, please let me know. I can provide a print-at-home copy in B&W for you.

-The print-at-home PDF of the pattern is in Letter/A4** format. Each page includes frame lines and triangles for easy matching and assembly.

**The pattern comes in letter size but should work for A4, too. Page settings on printer must be changed to letter before printing, and the pages scaling must be set to “no scaling”. If that does not work try the “borderless printing” option in your print settings.**

Show me your version

I’d love to see your versions! You can email pictures to me at moxiepatterns@gmail.com, or use #veritypattern on Instagram and tag @moxiepatterns.

 

The Girls sizes 1-8 is on the way. So, for anyone who might want a corresponding mother daughter look, you’re in luck! 🙂 I still need some testers for the girls size range, so if you know someone who might be interested, please send them my way. Thanks!



Verity Pattern Options


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Posted in clothing, diy, dress, fashion, General, indie, Moxie Patterns, pattern, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, shirt, Verity Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |1 Comment

Purple Plaid Archer Button Up Shirt

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The fall(ish) weather means I can finally wear this shirt comfortably again. I say fall weather, but I use that term so loosely….It’s seriously still been fluctuating into the high 80s here! My Morning Glories literally just started blooming yesterday morning. Last year they were blooming at the beginning of September. :o)

Anyway, I made this shirt last fall, using some thrifted material that I found several years ago. The pattern is Grainline’s Archer.

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This shirt was a labor of love.

When I first sewed it up, I basically had to take the shirt apart and re-cut every piece, particularly in the armhole and shoulder area. I also had to take the side seams in a lot because the shirt ended up way too loose for my figure. I can handle a bit of a relaxed fit nowadays, but I looked like I was wearing a shirt meant for my husband (who is 6′ and wears a men’s L-XL) when i first finished this one.

I chose my size between my high and full bust measurement (size 4), knowing I would want it to be slightly more fitted at the top. Then, I went down to a 2 at the waist, and faded out into a size 12 at the hips (since my hips measure around 43″ and the finished garment hip measurement for size 12 is listed at 44″. I also shortened the shirt  and sleeves by 1″.

I figured I probably should have done an FBA before cutting into the fabric, but this was a muslin and I was feeling lazy. Surprisingly, it was still super loose and way too big in the armhole and shoulders (yes, that shoulder seam was sitting even further down my arm (>_<). I probably should size down significantly (my high bust measurement is in line with the 0) and do an FBA if I ever use this pattern again. I like the look of a slightly relaxed fit on the bottom of a shirt, but I can only do it if the top portion is fairly fitted.

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I didn’t like how the shirt looked on me with two pockets, so I made it with only one. I think next time I’ll make it with two smaller pockets.

If I make the shirt again, narrow back and swayback adjustments are certainly in order. Since this was more of a wearable muslin, I wasn’t too concerned about those adjustments when I made this shirt.

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I do think that I will make it again at some point in the future, since I’ve already done the work to know what adjustments need to be made to achieve a good fit.

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I took all the pictures from my recent blog posts on the same day back in July, so it was a bit of a marathon afternoon with the tripod. My husband was making faces at me near the end, and it became more and more difficult not to laugh and end up with super bizarre poses. ;P

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Posted in blouse, clothing, fashion, General, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, shirt, thrifted Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |2 Comments

Two Plaid Shirts From Thrifted Dress

I’m back again with some another “catch-up” post from my hiatus. Here are two shirts that I made from a thrifted dress two Autumns ago.

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I cannot find the “before” picture of the dress that I used to make these two tops. It had a massive collar and a tie under the collar. I guess it was meant for those times when you can’t decide which neckline you like best.

It was like this dress with the sailor collar and tie, but the drop-waist pleated skirt was floor-length. There were also buttons down the back of the bodice.

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Anyway, I made a Deer and Doe Bruyere shirt solely from the skirt portion of the dress.

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I cut about a size smaller than my first Bruyere shirt. I also shortened the bodice pieces by about 1/2″ and the shirt bottom pieces by about 1.5″.  I cut the sleeves at elbow length and just finished them with a folded over band.

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I did the best I could with the plaid matching given the limited amount of material, and honestly, I was very surprised with the results.

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The other shirt was made from the bodice portion of the thrifted dresss. I took everything apart, reshaped the pieces and sewed it back together.

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The collar was a strange shape and it was very unflattering, so I removed the collar and reshaped the neckline. I left the buttons on the back bodice pieces and added a new tie at the neckline. The sleeves are much shorter and more fitted than the original sleeves.

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It’s pretty boxy, so it’s not my favorite top, but I have worn it tucked into a maxi skirt and with cardigans.

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The skirt I’m wearing in these photos is a Hummingbird that I made several years ago.

And because no post is complete without at least one photo of me being a goof…

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Au revoir!

Posted in clothing, diy, fashion, General, Reconstructing & Thrifting, recycled, redo, repurposed, retro, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, shirt, upcycled, vintage Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |8 Comments

Verity Re-launch & Peter Pan Collar Add-on

Hey everyone! I am re-launching my Verity pattern, to include a new Peter Pan collar option, an extended size range (XL-8X), and a girls size range (1-8). I am also offering a new A0 sheet format for those outside of the US who would like to print at a copyshop. Both of the new size ranges will be released within the coming weeks, so keep a lookout.

When I first released the pattern, it was somewhat premature, and it ended up being at a somewhat inopportune time in my life, which meant that I was unable to focus time on promoting it and expanding the size range. But hey, better late than never, right? Anyway, I am excited to re-launch the pattern and I hope you enjoy it. The dress has been a staple in my wardrobe for many years now.

I will have some versions made by other sewists to share with you soon. If you have made a version of Verity over the past couple of years, I would love to see it. Please send pictures (moxiepatterns@gmail.com) or a link to your blog, so I can feature you here. Or, if you are on Instagram, tag @moxiepatterns, and use #veritypattern.

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So, let’s talk about the new collar option. The Peter Pan collar is  my new favorite collar option to add to this dress, and it would look great with the shirt, as well. For a limited time, this add-on collar option will be included with every Verity purchase for free. This offer is also available to anyone who has previously purchased the pattern (just drop me a line, and I’ll send you the collar and instructions).

As I said, I will be sharing some versions of Verity made by others soon, but in the meantime, here are a couple of examples of the dress with the Peter Pan collar option.

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This has been one of my go-to dresses, ever since I made it at the end of last summer.

My younger sister also made one in her size that looks adorable on her.

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She made the straight XS, and despite her bust measurement being closer to the size S, this dress fits her perfectly. Normally she has to do a full-bust adjustment. I’m sure you also noticed that she is significantly taller than me, but due to the amount of stretch in this material, she did not have to lengthen the bodice.  Although, if she ever makes the dress from fabric with less stretch, she would likely need to lengthen the bodice pieces a bit.

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The Peter Pan collar can be made from the same material as the rest of the dress, or you could choose to make a contrasting collar. I like to use the same material for the skirt and the collar.

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I made the version above for myself about two and a half years ago. For this version I made the collar edges meet. If you would like your collar edges to come closer to meeting at center front, as in this version, the pattern piece would just need to be extended about 1/2″ at the center back fold location.

I also made the dress below recently, using the same material for the skirt and the collar.

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And this version for a plus sample size.

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The Peter Pan collar and instruction sheet are available together as an extension pack. Again, this will be a free gift with purchase of Verity for a limited time. After that, it will be available as a $2 add-on. You will receive separate PDFs for the print-at-home collar piece and the collar instruction booklet. The collar instruction booklet includes step-by-step photographs, just like the Verity pattern instructions.

You can use this button to purchase the XXS-L pattern with the Peter Pan collar extension pack.

The pattern is also available for immediate download on Craftsy and Etsy. For more details about the pattern, please see this page.

Happy sewing!

Sizes XL-8X and girls sizes 1-8 will be released within the coming weeks. Here are the size charts for those size ranges.

XL 1X 2X 3X 4X 5X 6X 7X 8X
Body Measurements (Inches)
Bust 40 41 43 45½ 48 50 52½ 55 57½
Waist 31 33½ 36 38½ 41 43 45½ 48 49
Hip 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59
Fabric Requirements (Yards)
View A
45”* 3⅝ 4 4⅛ 4⅝
60”* 3⅛ 3⅛ 3⅛ 3⅝ 3⅝
View B
45”* 3 3⅛ 3⅛ 3⅝ 3⅝
60” 2⅞ 2⅞ 2⅞ 3 3
View C
45”* 3 3⅛ 3⅛
60” 2 2⅛ 2⅝
Belt & Buttons (Optional)
60”** 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
Finished Garment (Inches)
Bust 39¾ 40¾ 42¾ 45¼ 47¾ 49¾ 52¼ 54¾ 57¼
Waist 30 32½ 35 37½ 40 42 44½ 47 48
Hip (B & C) 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58
Length(B & C) 29½ 30 30⅝ 31¼ 31⅝ 32½ 32⅞ 33½ 33⅞
Length (A) 40⅝ 41¼ 41¾ 42⅜ 42¾ 43⅜ 44 44½ 45

*Will only work if the fabric has 4-way stretch & no nap or directional print

**Can use less material if the belt is pieced, and not cut on the fold.

Note: This pattern is designed for stretch knit fabrics and is drafted with negative ease for a more fitted look. The hip measurement only matters for the shirt, and even then, a variation of a few inches larger will not matter, unless a looser, slouchy fit is preferred.

Girls Size 1-8 Measurement Chart

Size 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Bust 20 21 22 23 24 25 26.5 28
Waist 19 1/2 20 20 1/2 21 21 1/2 22 22 1/2 23
Hips 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 29
Posted in dress, General, Moxie Patterns, pattern, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, Verity Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |7 Comments

Stripe and Floral Print Mix Dress

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Last fall, I was especially fond of mixing prints together for outfits. So, I dreamed up this dress one day while looking through my fabric stash.

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Now that fall weather is finally making an appearance,  I am excited to wear this dress more again. The colors are very fall appropriate and it’s easy to put together layered outfits with this color mix.

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I made this dress using the Jennifer Lauren Vintage Bronte pattern. I just shortened the shirt into a bodice and added the skirt from my Verity pattern.

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Both knits are thrifted materials.

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Honestly, not too much else to say about this dress. It was a pretty quick and simple dress to sew up, but I still wanted to share her.

I was apparently feeling particularly goofy while taking these photos a few months back. So, here are some derpy poses and faces for the road. 😉

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See ya’ later. I hope Monday treats you well!

Posted in clothing, diy, dress, fashion, General, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, Verity Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | |4 Comments

Wheat Bushel Shirtdress & Superimposed Portraits

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Moving right along through the unblogged garments…I’ve got another dress to share that I made last year. I made it around my birthday last August, so it fits a bit loose on me now, but not enough to bother me. I always wear belts anyway.

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This dress is one of my favorite dresses, especially since it can easily go from season to season. I wore it with tights, cardigans and boots in the fall and winter.

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The material was a thrift store find. It’s a rayon blend of some kind. The wheat block print is reminiscent of a fabric from the ’40s.

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I lengthened the Deer & Doe Bruyere pattern to dress length and kept the same shirt hemline. I also made the dress sleeveless and finished the armhole edges with bias binding.

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The picture above had me laughing pretty hard. When I was editing it, my face reminded me of the faces in those floating superimposed head ’80s style portraits that everyone loves to (justifiably) deride.

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That sent me down an awesome rabbit trail in my family’s group message (Yes, my family is awesome and we have an ongoing Google Hangouts thread between me, my four sisters and my parents. :)) about old family photos. I asked my mom if she had any superimposed, floating head portraits of me as a baby, and she found a real gem.

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The face I’m making in the recent picture looks more like mom’s face in the picture below. Side note: doesn’t my mom look so beautiful?! Love you, momma! :*

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This post took a bit of a turn from sewing, but does anyone else have any awesome floating head photos of themselves or family members?

Posted in clothing, diy, dress, fashion, General, Life & Writing, Reconstructing & Thrifting, sewing, Sewing & Crafting, vintage Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | |4 Comments

Reinvigorated Kitchen Chalkboard Decor

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So, by now you have figured out that shades of turquoise and aqua are like a drug to me.

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Yes, I definitely have a problem. And yes, when observing my color addiction, people have been known to reference Marie’s purple obsession in Breaking Bad.

Here is a terrible photo of my wacky kitchen. As you can see, I have little blue accents everywhere. ;P Whatever… The color makes me happy, so why fight it?

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Also, gotta love those wacky ’70s scallop cabinets in combination with that ugly tile, right? Ha! Just so much going on in there. It’s extremely dark in the kitchen because it’s pretty closed off from any natural lighting. One day the kitchen will be renovated, but for now I’ll just enjoy its “retro” (although, probably not in a good way, in this case) charm.

Anyway, this chalkboard shelf…decoration…thing in my kitchen was an upcycle from a thrifted item. I think I bought it for about $2.

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I liked the decoration the way it was, especially the little decorative painting on the drawers. However, it had damage and marks on the wood, so staining it wasn’t really an option once I filled in the nicks and holes. I also didn’t really like the traditional green color of the chalkboard. So, I painted the chalkboard with black chalkboard paint.

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I added hanging loops to the back because the original piece only had two giant holes at the top, which I filled before painting.

Seeing this chalkboard sign as I walk out of the kitchen throughout the day really does brighten my mood.

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I should mention that my entire house is not shades of aqua and turquoise. It’s pretty concentrated in the living room and the kitchen. So, I’m just mostly crazy, not all crazy. The guest room and bathroom, for example, are grey and purple.

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Since it’s in the main household thoroughfare, it’s the perfect place to write inspirational quotes, bible verses, reminders, or even little love notes to my husband. <3 (Go ahead and gag, if you want ;))

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That little travel alarm clock from the ’60s was a flea market find.

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Well, I’m off to write a new love note on the chalkboard sign. Let the gagging ensue! ;P

Posted in diy, General, Home & Garden, Reconstructing & Thrifting, repurposed, retro, thrifted, upcycled, vintage Tagged , , , , , , , , , | |Leave a comment